Personnalités


Personnalités

Some of the relevant people associated with the history of the 42nd Division and the 167th (Alabama) Infantry Regiment.

Amerine, Captain William H.

Author of Alabama’s Own in France, a history of the 167th Infantry that was written in Sinzig, Germany while he served with the Army of Occupation. It was published in 1919, and remains as the road map to the regiment’s story.

Atkinson, Sergeant Ralph M.

Member of Regimental Mortar Section, distinguished himself at Côte de Châtillon on October 16, 1918 by stopping a large German counterattack. He held the group’s only mortar between his legs and adjusted fire by moving the tube by hand. Atkinson was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross.

Baker, Secretary of War Newton D.

Ordered the creation of the 42nd Division, visited it at Camp Mills on Long Island and in the trenches near Baccarat in France.

Bare, Lieutenant Colonel Walter E.

Regimental Executive Officer from the time of mobilization until October 11, 1918 when he became Acting Regimental Commander for the attack at the Côte de Châtillon. He served in that capacity until October 16, 1918 when the battle ended. Bare was promoted to Colonel while the 42nd Division was in Germany in the Army of Occupation. He was cited by the commanding officer of the 167th (Alabama) Infantry Regiment, recommended by Brigadier General MacArthur for the Distinguished Service Cross, a combat award, but it was not approved. He later received the Distinguished Service Medal, an administrative decoration, and achieved the rank of Brigadier General in the Reserves. .

First Lieutenant Ernest E. Bell

Platoon Leader in D Company from mobilization until the end of the war. He was co-leader with First Lieutenant Robert Espy in the 1st Battalion’s second assault that turned the tide of battle at Croix Rouge Farm on July 26, 1918. Of the 58 soldiers he led in that action, 23 came through unscathed. Bell was wounded.

Bell, First Lieutenant Ernest T.

Platoon Leader in Company H, was wounded on November 7, 1918 and died from wounds on November 11, 1918. He is buried in the Meuse-Argonne Cemetery, Lot D 34 07.

Bennett, Colonel Ernest R.

Commander of the 168th (Iowa) Infantry Regiment from mobilization until the heights of the Ourcq River. He was relieved on July 29, 1918 during the fighting there and replaced by Lieutenant Colonel Mathew W. Tinley.

Berriman, Second Lieutenant George W.

Platoon Leader in Company I, participated in leading, along with First Lieutenant Shelby Gamble and Second Lieutenant Dick Breeding, a record setting long range patrol into the Salient du Feys in the Baccarat Sector on April 18, 1918. On that patrol they killed seven Germans and shot up many more. Berriman was wounded on May 22, 1918 on patrol in Lorraine. His name frequently appeared on patrol rosters. He was killed at Champagne on July 15, 1918.

Breeding, Second Lieutenant Dick B.

Platoon Leader in A Company, cited by both the Commanding General of the “Rainbow” Division and the commanding officer of the 167th (Alabama) Infantry Regiment, which entitled him to two Silver Stars. He was an outstanding leader in the early combat of the regiment, and participated with Lieutenants Gamble and Berriman in the record setting long patrol into the Salient du Feys on April 18, 1918. Breeding was killed in the 2nd Battalion action on the heights of the Ourcq River on July 28, 1918.

Brown, Brigadier General Robert A.

Commander of the 84th Brigade of the 42nd Division. He was relieved during the fighting on the Ourcq in early August, 1918 and replaced by Colonel Douglas MacArthur. Colonel William P. Screws and others defended him in official testimony but some, including the 42nd Division Commander, said that he was indecisive and had collapsed mentally.

Bullard, Lieutenant General Robert Lee

A native of Lee County, Alabama, he rose to Command the 2nd US Army. General Bullard offered a brutal description of the Côte de Châtillon before it was taken and believed that more than a division might be required to take it.

Burr, Borden

A civilian, 42 year old, Alabama lawyer on a short YMCA contract, he was assigned to the 167th a few days before the fighting at Champagne. His unusual war service required going on foot from company to company, selling tobacco and sweets to the men, writing letters for illiterates and reminding all soldiers that the folks at home supported them. He was witness to the regiment’s bloodshed at Champagne and Croix Rouge Farm, with a ringside seat to defensive and offensive turning points of the war. After two months of service to the YMCA he returned to Alabama and brought a firsthand message about the war to many citizens of the state.

Campbell, First Lieutenant Dan

Platoon Leader with F Company at Champagne, relieved French units about 600 yards north of Souain at the intersection of the Souain – Somme – Py road on a front of 500 yards and a depth of 75 yards. It was the real front line, about 2,000 yards behind the false front line, the sacrificial line from which the French left as the battle started.

Campbell, First Lieutenant Duncan

Described the sound of a German rifle in a March 18, 1918 letter to his mother. It was “Tack Oh or Tacko.” He was wounded on July 28, 1918 on the hills of the Ourcq.

Carpenter, Father ,S.J.

Catholic chaplain of the 166th (Ohio) was present in the fortified house at Croix Rouge Farm immediately after it was captured. It had been taken by a mix group and was commanded byFirst Lieutenant Maurice W. Howe of the 167th’s L Company at dark on July 26, 1918.

Carroll, Major John W.

1st Battalion Commander from the time of mobilization through the fighting in France until July 28, 1918. During the German counterattack following the 1st Battalion’s successful second effort at Croix Rouge Farm on July 26, 1918, Major Carroll shouted, “Save your fire, men! We’ll give them hell with the bayonet.” On the Ourcq, command of the shot up and combined 1st and 3rd Battalions was passed to Captain Ravee Norris on July 28, 1918. Carroll took command of the regiment’s forward PC (Post of Command) from the gassed Lieutenant Colonel Walter E. Bare and was himself wounded there on July 28, 1918 by artillery fire that killed his orderly. He was cited by the 167th (Alabama) Infantry Regiment’s commanding officer, which entitled him to a Silver Star.

Couch, Private H. F.

Participated in four man reconnaissance patrol from K Company on May 13, 1918, It penetrated no-man’s-land to the German trenches. Alone, he entered a bunker and searched for intelligence materials. Couch was cited by the 42nd Division’s Commanding General, which entitled him to the Silver Star.

Dasch, Private Carl W.

A messenger for the 3rd Battalion along the Ourcq River from July 25, 1918 until August 1, 1918. There was no telephone wire in place and he constantly carried messages to the firing line and regimental headquarters, almost always under fire and often picking up wounded. Dasch was so badly gassed that he was ordered to report for treatment. He is believed to be the man from the 167th mentioned by Major William “Wild Bill” Donovan, an officer of the 165th (New York) who sought artillery assistance. Donovan said, “I thought I should never get back as I went up a little draw that was just singing with German machine gun and artillery fire. I had a liaison man from the 167th outfit and I shall never forget him. He knew the best course, the shortest routes, and the quickest crossing across the river. He was calm, self contained and cheerful. I should like to see him again.”

Donovan, Lieutenant Colonel William H. “Wild Bill »

A battalion commander of the 165th (New York) Infantry Regiment of the “Rainbow”, he was on the point of the regiment’s unsuccessful attack on the Kriemhilde Stellung on the eastern flank of the 167th (Alabama). That regiment and the 168th (Iowa) attacked the Côte de Châtillon at the strongest point of the four German lines of defense making the Hindenburg Line. After two days of fighting, Donovan was wounded before falling back on October 15, 1918, gaining him a nomination for the Congressional Medal of Honor. Donovan went on to become the World War II commander of the Office of Strategic Services and founder of the Central Intelligence Agency.

Duffy, Father Francis P.

Irish Catholic Chaplain of the 165th (New York) Infantry Regiment and Senior Chaplain of the 42nd Division, he was an inspiration to all and blessed thousands as they went into battle. He loved the men of the 167th (Alabama) and they loved him. Duffy attended a “Rainbow” reunion in Birmingham and was memorialized in New York with a life sized statue of him erected in Times Square.

Edmundson, Captain Lacey

Commander of D Company from the time of its mobilization until it demobilized, other than when he was in the hospital after being wounded on July 30, 1918 on the Ourcq River. Made up mostly of Bessemer men, D Company also included men from Huntsville and Greenville. The unit reached France with 232 men and 5 officers, returned to the United States with 81 men and 2 officers, 35 % of the originals. About 300 had joined the unit as replacements overseas, making a total of 550 people in the command at one time or another, including 17 officers. It led the assault at Croix Rouge Farm on July 26, 1918, in one of the few fights in which the bayonet was used. D Company casualties in that battle were estimated to be 50 killed and 140 wounded. Six of Captain Edmundson’s men wore Distinguished Service Crosses, four wore the French Croix de Guerre and one was cited by the 167th(Alabama) Infantry Regiment, which made him eligible for a Silver Star Medal.

Elliott, Sergeant Granville

Led covering patrols for I Company at Baccarat.

Espy, First Lieutenant Robert

A B Company Platoon Leader from mobilization until the end of the war, he was credited by Colonel William P. Screws with saving the regiment at Croix Rouge Farm on July 26, 1918. He led a strong patrol on the regiment’s left flank at the opening of the July 26, 1918 battle and, along with First Lieutenant Ernest E. Bell led the 1st Battalion’s successful assault late in the afternoon that is said to have turned the tide of battle. He was wounded and received a Distinguished Service Cross.

Esslinger, Captain Joseph P.

Commander of L Company from mobilization up to the Champagne when he was given Command of 3rd Battalion. He returned to L Company for the battle at Croix Rouge Farm, where he was wounded.on July 26, 1918. Command of L Company then passed to First Lieutenant Maurice W. Howe.

Fairchild, Second Lieutenant Hoxie

Platoon Leader in E Company led it in a counterattack at Champagne on July 15, 1918 and killed several Germans with his bayonet. He was cited by the Commanding General of the 42nd Division, which made him eligible to receive the Silver Star Medal.

Fallaw, Captain Thomas H.

Became I Company commander, organized, directed and carried through to successful conclusion all of the 167th (Alabama) front line activities at the Côte de Châtillon on October 16, 1918. With a provisional group of about 120 men, all that were left from the 3rd Battalion, he moved under cover of darkness to the west of the hill, reaching the attack position at 6:10 a.m. At about 10:00 a.m. the 151st (Georgia) Machine Gun Battalion fired for 30 minutes into the fortified German position, then lifted fire for 15 minutes to cover the German held crest and reverse slope. Fallaw and his men jumped off to the north and east from their position on the west side of the Côte. After the wild attack of his force, there were two German counterattacks. Elements of the 168th (Iowa) then converged on the hill at the same time as the Alabama forces and the position was taken by 4:00 p.m. with equal honors for all. Captain Fallaw was awarded a Distinguished Service Cross.  He had served as a sergeant on the Mexican Border and was commissioned before going to France.

Flowers, Captain Abner

G Company, rose from Platoon Leader to Battalion Commander. He had the distinction of being on the heights of the Ourcq River on July 28, 1918 with Corporal Sidney Manning when he won the Congressional Medal of Honor and on the Côte de Châtillon, on October 16, 1918 when Private Thomas S. Neibour won his Congressional Medal of Honor. Captain Flowers was wounded by artillery on November 7, 1918 while in command of 2nd Battalion during the Sedan drive.

Gamble, First Lieutenant Shelby V.

A D Company Platoon Leader, led the regiment’s second patrol to go into no-man’s-land and took a prisoner on the night of March 4, 1918. He participated, along with Second Lieutenant Dick Breeding and Second Lieutenant George Berriman, in a record setting long range patrol into the Salient du Feys in the Baccarat Sector on April 18, 1918. The patrol killed seven Germans and shot up more. He was wounded on July 26, 1918 at the Croix Rouge Farm. He commanded D Company in the attack element of the “Rainbow” in the St. Mihiel. Gamble was cited by the 167th (Alabama) Infantry and was eligible for a Silver Star Medal.

Glenn, Captain George A.

Headquarters Company, was made commander of 1st Battalion at St. Mihiel after Major Jorge was wounded on the first day, September 12, 1918, and after Jorge’s replacement, Captain Bryan Whitehurst, was wounded on September 21, 1918.

Gouraud, General Henri

French 4th Army Commander was the reported to directly by Major General Charles T. Menoher in the fighting at Champagne. Gouraud visited Montgomery. Alabama on August 5, 1923 and, on behalf of the nation of France, presented the Legion of Honor to William Preston Screws.

Green, Captain Gardner

Commander of C Company, was with the regiment in all operations until killed while leading his company in the “Rainbow” assault element at St. Mihiel on September 12, 1918. He was wounded on July 26, 1918 while leading his company in the 1st Battalion assault element at Croix Rouge Farm.

Greet, First Lieutenant Louis

F Company Platoon Leader, he took command of the company on July 28, 1918 on the eastern hills of the Ourcq River after Captain Frederick L. Wyatt was wounded. Lieutenant Greet was shortly wounded himself and handed the command to Lieutenant Curtis.

Griggs, 1st Lieutenant Henry L.

I Company, Opelika, wrote in his own hand about the fighting at Croix Rouge Farm. “This was the hardest fighting my battalion had during the war and was the only hand to hand fighting I saw during the war ».

Hall, Sergeant Varner

D Company, led the first patrol of the regiment into no-man’s-land on the night of March 4, 1918. Joined by Corporal Homer Whited, Corporal E. H. Freeman, Corporal Amos Teske and Sergeant James W. West, they entered a German trench and found nine enemies. In hand-to-hand fighting led by Corporal Whited, they took a prisoner, killed one and wounded two who got away along with five others. Sergeant Hall received the Distinguished Service Cross, the French Croix de Guerre and was mentioned in dispatches by the Division Commander which entitled him to a Silver Star Medal.

Hill, Private Brock

F Company on July 15, 1918, in the Champagne defense, shot down a German airplane with a Browning Automatic Rife. It was said to be the first plane brought down by rifle fire by an American soldier. For this he was promoted to Sergeant.

Howe, First Lieutenant Maurice W.

French speaking, he set up 3rd Battalion P.C. (Post of Command) at Courpoil on July 25, 1918. At Croix Rouge Farm on July 26, 1918 Howe assumed command of L Company from Captain Joseph P. Esslinger when he was wounded. He then led small elements of L Company along with some from B Company of the 151st (Georgia) Machine Gun Battalion and Company K and Company I of the 167th (Alabama) in a successful attack by the pick up force. They reached the farmhouse at Croix Rouge in the late afternoon of July 26, 1918. Later he was given command of H Company for the St. Mihiel attack. On the night of September 22-23, 1918 Howe led a highly successful come-and-go raid on a village in front of his lines there, killing 15 to 20 Germans and taking 16 prisoners.

Jackson, Captain Everett H.

Commanded Company E from mobilization until given command of 2nd Battalion for the July 15, 1918 battle at Champagne, and continued to hold that command when it crossed the Ourcq and fought on the hills to the east of it until the Germans retreated.

Joerg, Major Robert, Jr.

Adjutant and Headquarters Company Commander from mobilization until given command of 1st Battalion, the assault battalion for the fighting at St. Mihiel. He was wounded there on the first day, September 12, 1918. Command of 1st Battalion was returned to him for the Argonne and Côte de Châtillon. He was the officer to whom Private Thomas S. Neibaur surrended 11 German prisoners, setting in motion the process of Neibour’s being awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor.

Jordan, Captain Mortimer H., M.D.

A medical doctor, he commanded K Company from the time of mobilization until it went into the trenches of Lorraine in February, 1918. He enjoyed command and loved his soldiers. Before leaving Camp Mills he was selected to serve as a member of the 42nd Division General Court, which tried serious crimes. In France he was selected for the elite three month long staff school at Gondrecourt. On completion he was appointed the first Operations Officer for the regiment in time to help organize the French-American defense in the Champagne on July 15, 1918. Jordan participated in the July 26, 1918 attack at Croix Rouge Farm. Along with the regimental executive officer, he was assigned a position directly behind the 1st Battalion’s attacking forces with responsibility for reorganizing casuals and disorganized units. They put together a counterattack that night that was led by Lieutenant Royal Little. Jordan was wounded on July 28, 1918 while conferring with Major Dallas H. Smith during the fighting on the hills east of the Ourcq. Evacuated to a field hospital, he died from wounds on August 2, 1918 and is buried in Arlington. He was mentioned in dispatches by the 42nd Division Commanding General and the Commander of the 167th (Alabama), making him eligible for two Silver Star Medals.

Kelly, First Lieutenant Richard B., Jr.

Commanded G Company in the attack on the high ground east of the Ourcq on July 28, 1918. Kelly was wounded in the fighting when Corporal Sidney Manning’s platoon leader and platoon sergeant were killed and Manning took command of 35 men leading them over the crest of a hill to an enemy strong point.

Kilmer, Sergeant Joyce

Member of Intelligence Section in Major William J. “Wild Bill” Donovan’s 1st Battalion of the 165th (New York) Infantry Regiment. He was killed on July 30, 1918 near Meurcy Farm while with Donovan in fighting along the Ourcq. Kilmer was a prominent American poet, author of Trees, a poem about the environment, and Rouge Bouquet, a famous World War I war poem about a “Rainbow” tragic loss.  He was made poet laureate of the United States after his death.

Lenihan, Brigadier General Michael J.

83rd Brigade Commander, was relieved by V Corps Commander Major General Charles P. Summerall on October 15, 1918 after his 165th (New York) Infantry Regiment was forced to pull back from the left flank of the 167th (Alabama) at the Côte de Châtillon.

Little, First Lieutenant Royal

A Platoon Leader with the 167th (Alabama) from its time at Camp Mills. He led some of the regiment’s first patrols in the spring of 1918 while a Second Lieutenant at Baccarat. Little led a provisional company to counterattack a German threat Croix Rouge Farm on the night of July 26, 1918, staying in position all night on the regiment’s left flank.. He commanded K Company on the 3rd Battalion front line assault at the Côte de Châtillon in October, 1918. A native of Pawtuckett, Rhode Island, he had dropped out of Harvard and served with the regiment throughout the war. After the war he completed his degree and entered business by buying a failing textile manufacturing company. He bought more and consolidated them and added other kinds of businesses under the flagship management of a company called Textron. It was recognized as the first successful model of a large conglomerate in the United States.

Manning, Corporal Sidney S.

Squad Leader of a Browning Automatic Rifle squad and one of four Mannings in G Company. His company commander was wounded and his platoon leader and platoon sergeant were killed in the 2nd Battalion advance on the morning of July 28, 1918. Manning took command of 35 men and led them over the crest of a hill to an enemy strong point dominating the valley of the Ourcq. Repeatedly wounded, he pushed forward until all but 7 of his force were killed or wounded. Alone, he directed their return to the G Company position with covering fire. Manning was the first in the regiment to receive the Congressional Medal of Honor and one in only five in the Rainbow Division to receive it.  He is recognized in the Alabama Military Hall of Honor at Marion Institute in Marion, Alabama and is a hero of the regiment.

Marshall, Major George C.

Served in General Pershing’s Plans Section at Chaumont throughout the war, where many “Rainbow” operations originated.

Menoher, Major General Charles T.

Commanding General of the 42nd “Rainbow” Division throughout its service in France.

Neibaur, Private Thomas S.

Automatic Rifleman in M Company, helped to break up a counterattack on October 16, 1918 while on the Côte de Châtillon. He was wounded and receiving German artillery fire. On jumping into a shell hole for protection Neibaur found that it contained Germans. They took him prisoner. When the fire subsided the Germans ran for their lines with the American in tow, leaving their rifles behind. Neibaur, who still had a pistol, killed 4 Germans and took 11 prisoner, delivering them to 1st Battalion commander. He received the Congressional Medal of Honor, the second soldier from the regiment and the fifth from the “Rainbow” to do so.  He was the first Mormon recipient of the nation’s highest combat award.

Norris, Captain Ravee

Initial Commander of Company M, was in all of the operations of the 167th (Alabama). On July 28, 1918 he was given command of the combined 1st and 3rd Battalions during the fighting along the Ourcq and later was given command of the rebuilt 3rd Battalion for the St. Mihile operation. He was wounded at St. Mihiel on September 12, 1918, the first day of the attack. In the Argonne, Norris moved 3rd Battalion into position at the base of Côte de Châtillon on October 11, 1918. He participated in making the final assault plan that included using all available men in the battalion for the assault on that day. The advance on the hill was led by Captain Thomas A. Fallaw of I Company, who had also participated in making the final plan. Norris followed the assaulting force. Norris was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross.

Parrish, Sergeant Grady G.

G Company Platoon Sergeant , whose Platoon Leader had been killed during the attack at Côte de Châtillon on October 16, 1918. Parrish led in breaking up a German counterattack. He then reorganized his men for the final successful assault. Parrish received the Distinguished Service Cross.

Powell, First Lieutenant John H.

Commander of I Company at Croix Rouge Farm on July 26, 1918, was given the job of reorganizing casuals and disorganized units when the 3rd Battalion attacked. He was killed doing it. I Company losses were reported to be about 30 killed and 100 wounded. Powell was cited by the 167th (Alabama) Regiment, which entitled him to a Silver Star Medal.

Riley, Corporal Major D.

Squad Leader in G Company on the morning of July 15, 1918 in the Champagne was in the front of the regiment’s resistance to the German attack. Under fire, he leaped to the parapet of his trench and shot a German manning a machine gun. Another enemy took the dead man’s place. Riley again jumped to the parapet and killed that one. Five times the gunner was replaced and five times Riley killed a man. In another attempt, the Alabamian was killed by a bullet to the head.

Romslo, Ole O.

Ole O. Romslo was born at Romslo in Norway on 20 Nov 1891. He was the third of 12 siblings and his mother died in 1907. In 1908, at the age of 16, he emigrated to Mobridge, (Walworth County) where his aunt (Mrs John Frisvold) and family lived. Ole first worked at John Frisvold Jr’s farm in Lemon, Perkins County, SD before starting to work in 1917 for Mr Ed Eklo in Mobridge. After he was drafter, he received some training at Camp Pontis where he was part of the Fourth South Dakota Infantry regiment, K company, before he was transferred to Europe. There, he was assigned to the 42nd Division, 84th Infantry Brigade, 167th Infantry, 3rd Battalion, Company G. He fought during the battle of Champagne and died at the Ourcq on July 27, 1918 during the assault of G Company led by Sidney Manning who received a Medal of Honor for his actions.

Screws, Colonel William Preston

Commander of 167th (Alabama) Infantry Regiment for all its training and all its combat except for the taking of the Côte de Châtillon in October, 1918, when he was hospitalized with flu. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal by the United States and made a member of the Legion of Honor by the nation of France and achieved the rank of Brigadier General in the US Reserves.

Smith, First Lieutenant Allen M.

Platoon Leader of K Company led a small group charge to the farmhouse at Croix Rouge Farm from the 3rd Battalion position on July 26, 1918 and was wounded.

Smith, Major Dallas B.

3rd Battalion Commander from mobilization until he was wounded on July 28, 1918 at the Ourcq. He was cited by the commander of the 167th (Alabama) Infantry Regiment and made eligible for the Silver Star Medal.

Strassburger, Captain Julien M.

Commander of Machine Gun Company, distinguished himself at Champagne on July 15, 1918 and was killed leading his company in the 1st Battalion assault at Croix Rouge Farm on July 26, 1918. He was cited by the commander of the 167th (Alabama) Infantry Regiment and made eligible for the Silver Star Medal.

Thompson, Captain Herman W.

H Company Commander from the time of mobilization until the fighting on the heigths of the Ourcq. His company occupied a dangerous position in the front of the 167th (Alabama) forces in meeting the German attack in the Champagne on July 15, 1918. H Company was said to have lost 16 killed there. Thompson continued in command until being badly wounded on July 28, 1918 in the fighting above the Ourcq. Thompson was cited by the commander of the 167th(Alabama) Regiment and made eligible for the Silver Star Medal.

Thorp, Private Hugh H.

F Company rifleman was stationed on the main German attack route at Champagne on July 15, 1918. Positioned above a communication trench, he threw 6 boxes of hand grenades into it during the course of the battle, killing nineteen Germans.

Vann, Private Daniel D.

Private Vann was in the assault element of B Company, 167th (Alabama) regiment, at Croix Rouge Farm and was seriously wounded during the July 26th attack. He was machine gunned in the arm and lower torso. Family history relates that he was in a pile of the dead when someone noticed his hand move. Dan survived the war but never walked again. Several years later he eventually died as a result.

Whitehurst, Captain Bryan

Commanded B Company from mobilization until being given command of the 1st Battalion on July 28, 1918. Its regular commander, Major John W. Carroll was wounded at that time on the hills of the Ourcq. Earlier, Bryan had taken over remnants of the battalion’s second effort assault platoons commanded by Lieutenants Espy (B Company) and Bell (D Company). He consolidated them and others at the Croix Rouge farmhouse late in the day on July 26, 1918, capturing 27 German machine guns. Whitehurst kept command of the 1st Battalion throughout the fighting on the Ourcq but then relinquished it to Major Robert Joerg, Jr. Jorge for the St. Mihiel operation. Joerg was wounded with the assault element on the first day of fighting at St. Mihiel, September 12, 1918. The command was then returned to Captain Whitehurst until he was wounded on September 21, 1918 and passed it to Captain George A. Glenn.

Whited, Corporal Homer

D Company, participated in the first patrol of the regiment into no-man’s-land on the night of March 4, 1918. It was led by Sergeant Varner Hall and joined by Corporal E. H. Freeman, Corporal Amos Teske and Sergeant James W. West. They entered a German trench and found nine enemies. Corporal Whited led in hand-to-hand fighting. The group took a prisoner, killed one and wounded two who got away along with five others. Corporal Whited was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross, the French Croix de Guerre and was cited by the Division Commander which entitled him to a Silver Star Medal

Winn, Major Cooper D., Jr.

(see website)
Commanded the 151st (Georgia) Machine Gun Battalion at the Côte de Châtillon, reporting directly to the 84th Brigade, commanded by Brigadier General Douglas MacArthur. Winn personally assigned targets to 65 machine guns placed on the forward slope of Hill 263 prior to the October 16, 1918 attack by the 167th (Alabama) on the Côte. At about 10:00 a.m. his guns commenced indirect and enfilade (down into) firing for 30 minutes into the fortified German position, then lifted fire for 15 minutes to cover the crest and reverse slope. When the moving fire lifted, the assault force of about 120 men from the 3rd Battalion of the 167th (Alabama) Infantry Regiment jumped off and attacked to the north and east.from the west side of the Côte. Due to the supporting machine gun fire, the attacking infantry had less resistance and fewer casualties than anticipated. There were two German counterattacks. Elements of the 168th (Iowa) converged on the hill at the same time as the Alabama forces and the position was taken by 4:00 p.m. with equal honors for the two regiments. Brigadier General MacArthur cited Winn for honors and recommended him for the Distinguished Service Cross, a combat award. It was not approved, but Winn received a Distinguished Service Medal and promotion to Lieutenant Colonel.

Wren, First Lieutenant Edward “Shorty” R.

Mortar Section Leader of 3rd Battalion knocked out German machine gun nests around the farmhouse at Croix Rouge Farm. It was the only successful use of 167th (Alabama) mortars in the battle and occurred at a time on July 26, 1918 when the 3rd Battalion appeared doomed. He was awarded a Distinguished Service Cross, the Belguim Order de Leopold and was cited by the Commanding General of the 42nd Division, making him eligible for the Silver Star Medal.

Wyatt, Captain Frederick. L.

Commander of F Company from the time of mobilization and led it at the Champagne on July 15, 1918 when Private Brock Hill shot down a German airplane with a Browning Automatic Rife and Private Hugh H. Thorp killed 19 Germans with hand grenades. Captain Wyatt was wounded on July 28, 1918 in the attack on the hills east of the Ourcq. On that morning Lieutenant Greet succeeded him, was wounded, and handed the command to Lieutenant Curtis.

Young, First Lieutenant Harry R.

Platoon Leader of I Company, led a successful small group charge to the farmhouse at Croix Rouge Farm on July 26, 1918 from the 3rd Battalion position south of it. He was seriously wounded.